waterfront phase 3 gets green light

MJA are pleased to announce that the plans for the redevelopment of the rothesay hotel in rhos on sea has been approved by conwy borugh council. The new build scheme comprising 40 apartments, has been designed to sympathetically blend in with the seaside style of architecture but with contemporary design...

Planning update-new requirements for planning applications in Wales-Sept 1st ’09

All applications for 5 or more dwellings recieved on or after 1 September 2009 must meet Code for Sustainable Homes Level 3 and obtain 6 credits under issue Ene1 – Dwellings Emission Rate. All applications for 1 or more dwellings recieved on or after 1 September 2010 must meet Code for Sustainable Homes Level 3 and obtain 6 credits under issue Ene1 – Dwelling Emission Rate. Applications recieved on or after 1 September 2009 for any non-residential development which wil either have a floor space of 1000 sq m or more, or will be carried out on a site having an area of one hectare or more must meet the BREEAM ‘Very Good’ standard and achieve the mandatory credits for ‘Excellent’ under issue Ene1-Reduction of CO2 Emissions. This new legislation comes into force as the Welsh Assembly begins to implement its ‘One Wales’ agreement, which sets out a sommitment to combat the effects of climate change. A key part of this commitment includes the aspiration for all new builds to be ‘zero carbon’ by 2011. Research was recently carried out by AECOM to identify the practical implications for local authorities of implementing and helping low and zero carbon developments through the planning system. To view this report, follow the link below:...

Rules to make micro-generation easier in Wales come into force (WAG web site)

Installing micro-generation equipment such as solar panels in Welsh homes becomes easier as new planning rules come into force. Environment Minister Jane Davidson hopes the changes will give households the opportunity to minimise their carbon footprint and to reduce fuel bills. The aim of the changes is to remove certain types of micro-generation equipment from requiring planning permission, making it easier for individuals and local communities install equipment that will contribute to tackling climate change and lower energy bills. There will be no requirement to pay planning fees, also reducing the financial burden. Equipment that comes under the new rules includes: small scale solar panels ground source heat pumps, and biomass flues. Ms Davidson said: “A key part to tackling climate change will be lessening our reliance on carbon based energy. This is where micro-generation has a major role to play. It gives households the opportunity to produce their own clean, green energy. “Here in Wales we have a large share of off gas-grid homes where micro-generation could provide an alternative. We want these new rules to encourage people to consider micro-generation and make it easier for them begin producing their own...